PDA

View Full Version : CNC you got it easy


Crash Tester
07-12-2009, 05:15 AM
Hi Guys,

Wow you guys have it easy with your softwar writing the code, I do it manually ;) We get a drawing then write a programe:clappp Dosent take long and I think is alot faster, as we use our owen speeds/feeds and movement X,Y,Z as opposed to being big safe coordinates:tongue, the code is smaller so runs faster and you can store more programes in memoery, also we use alot of macros which is amazing:noteworthy, for example we make parts of different lengths etc. 1 number change in the global variables will change everything to make a new part, drill depth, turn length, ream depth, thread depth etc.:tongue

Tornos Deco 20s

Daz

TMoore
07-14-2009, 10:44 PM
I write code manually too but for one or two piece jobs with 3D contours, software wins every time. On Eurotech CNC turning centers the code is almost always done by hand for speed but those programs tend to be short and use canned cycles.

TM

stevo082
07-17-2009, 04:52 AM
I also write gcode and optimize the code spat out by CAM.

philmckrackon
07-17-2009, 07:07 PM
For the easy wire edm programs I do - I write by hand...

This what I have been working on lately (the 1st stage fan blades) - not a good way to do this, but by CAD / CAM! :)

http://ge.ecomagination.com/_files/images/products/genx/genx_zoom_04.jpg

iflymyhelishigh
07-18-2009, 06:30 PM
THE SPIRAL!!!

Do you know what the purpose ofthe spiral is for?

philmckrackon
07-18-2009, 08:23 PM
THE SPIRAL!!!

Do you know what the purpose ofthe spiral is for?Is that a question for me? I did not understand the post...

Winfred
07-19-2009, 08:11 PM
THE SPIRAL!!!

Do you know what the purpose ofthe spiral is for?

http://www.aerospaceweb.org/question/propulsion/q0233a.shtml

EDMKing
07-28-2009, 12:24 PM
I used to repair / install and train on Wire EDM machines. They are some pretty neat tech. I would love to get a small cnc mill to make my own parts. Only thing stopping me is $$ hahah :arggg:

BKF
10-01-2009, 12:50 PM
I really should get more into CAM software, but I still do stuff by hand with AutoCAD and manual Gcode programming of absolute coordinates.

From what I gather, BobCAD seems like a good program. Do others concur?

Prontow
10-01-2009, 02:17 PM
I really like D2NC for my G-Code generator. It imports a AutoCAD DXF file. I have been using it for about a year with good results, plus it's pretty cheap. It ended up costing me $40.00 when I bought a license package for it and Mach3.

67Yankee
10-01-2009, 04:59 PM
I really should get more into CAM software, but I still do stuff by hand with AutoCAD and manual Gcode programming of absolute coordinates.

From what I gather, BobCAD seems like a good program. Do others concur?

It's all about using the right tool for the job. I started out with a scientific calculator and legal pad and did some interesting things but it took some time. I moved up to Bobcad and that really helped a lot. I ran my shop with Bobcad for a good couple of years so I'd say it is a good program if you're doing simple stuff or you're just programming things for yourself. If you're trying to run a full CNC shop however, Bobcad can't compete. Nowadays I'm programming with Mastercam for a live tooled lathe, 2 different makes of 3 axis milling manchine, 3 different 5 axis mills and a CNC router. I couldn't go back to Bobcad now but it helped me get where I am.

relax1
10-05-2009, 10:27 PM
Simple 2D turning and milling sometimes is easier to write the code manualy. But when you start getting into 3 axis and 4th simultaneous is almost imposible to write code without the help of a good cam software like Mastercam. Virtual Gibbs. Edgecam etc. Specially when it comes to surface cutting of molds where is pretty common to have a 1MB to 3MB and larger file lenght.

Luis

Tooler
12-15-2009, 09:15 PM
Solidworks for solid models then move into Mastercam to machine, turn or wire 2-3-4 or 5 axis. Its the bomb.

corona007
02-12-2010, 02:31 PM
I really should get more into CAM software, but I still do stuff by hand with AutoCAD and manual Gcode programming of absolute coordinates.

From what I gather, BobCAD seems like a good program. Do others concur?

I been using Bobcad since early 90's besides higher end software. At that time I was using it for programing edm machines and the company was too cheap to buy better software, But it did the the job.

A couple of years ago I purchased V20 for 200.00 as a student chair. It sure has come a long way from when I started using it. It still sucks for designing/drawing but it's very capable of spitting out 3D G-code.

I did these parts using Bobcad.http://www.helifreak.com/album.php?albumid=2602

seanh
02-12-2010, 06:32 PM
I wonder if the newer more current software is actually better.

I'm a GIS mapper....actually a landman that generally knows a computer. But, contracting to do mapping today.

Anyway...I'm using the current flavor of arcgis 9.3...piece of junk. It takes me at least 5x longer to do most daily work and some functions are gone...For example...simple snapping (had tools to snap on the fly..GONE tools don't convert) So. Simple point click turns into point click...select vendor tool, work through their screens...Or, I used to create multiple graphics and import then update attribute data all at once...Now, one at a time. Just spent all day working on something that took me less than an hour before.

Anyone see this problem in the CAD world?

I know it's not directly related...kid of venting after a long day.

*MoNSteR*
05-02-2010, 09:20 PM
I have been a programmer in the aerospace/defense industry for many years and as a consultant I have used just about every CAD/CAM environment there is. As someone said, its about having the right tools, and most mentioned so far in this thread are not the right tools this day and age. However some of the tools are seemingly out of the budget of most in this thread.

Needless to say, what you have learned to use will always be the best/fastest in your eyes, especially if YOU had to pay for it, after all your not going to pay for another CAM package, then have to learn it.

In my normal day-to-day operations I use Surfcam, preferably in conjunction with a Solidworks model. While Surfcam definitely has its issues it is hands down the fastest CAM application I have personally used. Contrary to popular belief, Mastercam is one of the worst I have ever used and there are many CAM packages available today that blow MC out of the water in every respect. Not putting down anyone who uses it, just my experienced opinion.

I have had many many little "competitions" with coworkers on this matter, and with the right CAM package, even if you have to create your own geometry within this environment, wins hands down every time. Of course, you also have to take in to account the abilities of the programmer to do this in an efficient manner. I know some CAM operators who really know their CAM envoronment, but are just slow as molases at operating the thing simply because their general computer skills are really poor and efficiency suffers greatly because of it.

For the most part its all subjective, and there really isnt a definitive test as everyone has their opinion and will always be argumentative. But in most cases, the exception being some turning operations where canned cycles may prevail, CAD/CAM will beat manual programming for even the simplest of tasks given you have a competent and efficient operator for your particular software/machine control.

I know in my time as a CAD/CAM/OPERATOR, a solid modelling envoronment with a good CAM package will ALWAYS give you a faster time to part, sometimes compressing weeks or months worth of work into just hours or days.