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Old 05-22-2012, 08:01 AM   #1
Tukmol
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Default Real Transmitter or Fake for Sim

Hello! Im new to rc helis. Need your advice . Im planning to buy micro heli and simulator for practice. Is it better to buy the sim with fake transmitter or buy a real transmitter that i can use for sim(cheaper w/o fake transmitter)and for bigger heli when im ready?
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Old 05-22-2012, 03:44 PM   #2
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If you are new to the hobby then you are in a good position that it will not matter a heck of a lot either way. Just get your hands on the controls of any transmitter and start practicing away. The "feel" of the transmitter is irrelevant at this point, just start learning control you can worry about the controller later when you're ready to move up.
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Old 05-23-2012, 12:22 AM   #3
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Thanks! My msrx just arrived. Looks like I'm not buying bigger heli soon. Controlling this thing is really hard, it doesn't calm down lol
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Old 05-23-2012, 12:27 PM   #4
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I have the means to connect my DX6i to my sim, but I usually just use the realflight controller for the sake of convenience. I like being able to just sit down and drill for 10 minutes or so whenever I feel like it, keep it as simple as possible.

It's all about what works for you though! If your sim comes with a controller I wouldn't worry about it at this point, like raza said you're just developing reflexes at this point. Also don't stress out about trying to find a heli in the sim that flies just like your real one.
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Old 05-23-2012, 10:10 PM   #5
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Thanks! Are sims realistic enough to use as indicator if I'm ready to fly a normal sized heli? I mean, If I'm good at sim, does it mean I can fly the real thing?
sorry for my english(2nd language)
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Old 06-30-2012, 07:20 PM   #6
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I'm a relatively noobie flyer who was recently in your position (been driving cars for ages, though). A sim is invaluable to learn stick control, as in it'll help you a lot to learn hovering and basics, for instance. It's very different from a real model, though. I don't believe that the type of controller is going to matter much at your stage, use the one included with your sim to learn. If you're relatively sure you'll move on to real models, read on.

I recently bought a "real" heli (mcpx) which is challenging, while it can take a lot of abuse, I'd recommend this route to any learner. I splurged on a DX6i as well, as I figured I'm probably be flying larger models before long. I don't have a lot of time on sims, but with this heli you can fail without necessarily having to buy parts.


The fancy radio has some advantages for a budding flyer as you can tame your model down for relatively painless learning. If you feel that you're sure you will go on with this hobby, and you're not on an extremely tight budget, I'd say that you might as well go for a DX6i (best value for starters like us) sooner rater than later. It can be used with most sims.

Last edited by Man Eating Duck; 07-01-2012 at 10:41 AM.. Reason: Typo
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Old 07-01-2012, 11:22 AM   #7
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The 2 best sims out now are phoenix and real flight, which it seems like those are what you're talking about.
Realflight is the only one I use, I have no problem using the USB transmitter. It's more convenient, and doesn't drain my dx7s battery.
In the beginning stages, you won't be able to tell a difference between the two sims. Both are very realistic. When you start advancing though, you will be able to tell. Phoenix v4 is very good, but one thing it doesn't do very well is the inertia of the models. The fly seemingly weightless, which is crap. Realflight is dead on to the real thing. I own a Rave ENV, and that's all I fly in Realflight 6 as well. It's dead nuts realistic, I can go from sim to field with no lapse.
Keep in mind however, that when starting out you won't be able to tell these slight differences. If you can't tell the difference when flying a different set of blades, then the sims will both feel the same. Starting the hobby is more about finding what works in your budget.
I work at a hobby shop though, and I tell everybody this, because this is almost a daily question.
Phoenix is best to start with, just for plain cost reasons. Buy a dx6i for 160 and phoenix for 130. Don't bother at all with the included dx5 for 185... spend a little more and get the 6. If you are looking for flat out simulator realism, Realflight hands down.
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Old 07-04-2012, 04:40 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tukmol View Post
Thanks! Are sims realistic enough to use as indicator if I'm ready to fly a normal sized heli? I mean, If I'm good at sim, does it mean I can fly the real thing?
Opinions vary. Keep in mind that the finger movements are very similiar, so if you are confident about controlling the heli in the sim, then the real thing won't be too different. It'd help to try out different types of heli's in the sim too, so you can quickly adapt to different feels..

On the other hand, the sim does absolutely NOTHING for many real world issues, such as distance and depth perception, sunlight in your face, watering eyes, a mosquito biting your ear that you can't swat, fear and shaky hands/legs, badly set up helis that do unpredictable things, and distractions like people or animals. On top of that, you often sit and hold the controller differently, which can greatly affect your control.

So I think the sim is good for training your fingers to quickly move the right way, but you still need to go out and learn to fly for real. Take it slowly and you should be ok.
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Old 07-06-2012, 09:36 PM   #9
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Thanks for the replies . I decided to buy a dx7s and mcp x.

I've noticed that flying normally(not 3d) it's a lot harder in simulator but in 3D it easier.
In real I can't even flip an mcpx but in simulator I can roll,invert,flip the first time I tried, no need for practice. so there must be something wrong with my mcpx,sim or me lol.
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Old 07-16-2012, 09:00 PM   #10
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I got a smoking deal on my Blade 400 but I had only been flying an MSR so I bought the Pheonix sim before I started flying my 400. I am soooooo glad I did. It really helped me to get the basics down and develop the muscle memory to hover and do basic tail in maneuvers. Once I picked up the 400 it was close but there was still a huge learning curve. There's no substitute for the real thing. Some models are closer than others. The mCPx in the sim is nothing like flying my real mCPx. The Blade 400 is actually surprisingly close.

The biggest difference between a sim and real thing is nerves. The noise, the risk, the cost involved in crashing makes you second guess things that are easy on the sim. Plus you get wind, bad light, bright light etc. You can adjust settings in the sim all day long but you'll never get all the variables that you do at the field. You can't simulate a bug flying in your eye while you're flying lol.
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Old 07-18-2012, 01:09 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aksport View Post
You can't simulate a bug flying in your eye while you're flying lol.
I have 3 kids that disagree with you
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Old 07-18-2012, 08:31 PM   #12
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I bought phoenix,mcpx and dx7s. I'm comfortable flying upright in any orientations now and yesterday was my first loop (i was trying to flip LOL) thanks to this forum.
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