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Old 04-07-2012, 10:22 PM   #1
jaccojenkins72
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Arrow vibration on my aeroworks 300 100cc.

I have a very nice aeroworks extra 300 100cc with a DA 100 on it. I tipped it over on take off because I had my elevator reversed. The carbon fiber pro was damaged just slightly and when I say slightly, I mean just a tiny chip on it. When I crank it up now, there is a vibration to it that was not there before. Is it cause my prop is now out of balance, or could my motor be damaged.? the vibration is noticeable but not extreme, but noticeable, especially in the wings. Can anyone help me?
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Old 04-07-2012, 10:29 PM   #2
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Re balance your prop and check the run-out on the crank.

Actually....you might want to think about just replacing the prop. If it fails mid flight it won't be pretty.
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Old 04-07-2012, 10:49 PM   #3
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whats run out?
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Old 04-08-2012, 02:13 AM   #4
GunnyGlow
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Will tell you if the crank is bent or not. They make fancy dial indicators. Taking the mainshaft out of a heli and rolling it across a piece of glass is how you can check to see if it is bent...or, if there is too much run out.

In your case I might try pulling the spark plug out so there isn't any compression and rotating the crank by hand. If you can keep the plane from moving you could leave the engine on the airframe. I would probably get a ruler, or something to measure length, and hold it so you can see the bottom of the hub next to the ruler. If as you rotate the measurement from the ground/table to the bottom of the hub stays the same-no run out/no bent crank. But, if as you rotate the crank and the hub is...lets say 75mm from the ground/table on one side and on the other side of the hub it is 71mm....then you get to buy a new crank. Probably some new bearings, too.

Make sense? Here is a youtube vid of someone measuring run out on a router. Same sort of thing....but a better way to do it than I described.
!

I'm not a giant scale expert by any means....so, please excuse the 'loose' terminology.
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Old 04-08-2012, 12:07 PM   #5
invertmast
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First off.

1: Start doing control checks before ever taxiing before flight.. that will keep this from happening..

2. I highly doubt your crank is bent if you have a quality engine (DA, DLE, 3W, etc) if its some chinese brand X, then you may want to check the run-out.

3. without seeing photo's of the prop.. REPLACE IT. any damage to a carbon prop, no matter how small could prove very bad due to internal damage you can't see.
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Old 04-09-2012, 10:16 AM   #6
Ace4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by invertmast View Post
3. without seeing photo's of the prop.. REPLACE IT. any damage to a carbon prop, no matter how small could prove very bad due to internal damage you can't see.
+1

Not worth potentially destroying a $4000 airplane because of a questionable $90 prop. Just like heli blades, anything made of wood or carbon that spins at high speed and contacts the ground should be considered unsafe.
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Old 04-10-2012, 08:46 AM   #7
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its really hard to bend the shaft, it would take a pretty good hit to even try and knock it off slightly,

the prop is likly to be the culprate, if the prop is not visibly damaged in any way then its quite an easy task to put it right,

carbon props are difrent from the reguar run of the mill props, they can be weakend and fratured without many tell tale signs, a prop strike isnt a good thing for carbon props, they can get cracks internaly even though there incredibly strong they dont take to knocks well due to rigity,

was the prop strike on dirt or something harder/softer, if it was grass or dirt il say it should be safe enough to repair it by rebalancing if you remove it to find cracks in the finish, best replace it, its not worth prop failure,

running the prop unbalanced and you risk damage to the engine bearings, and internals, and also radio gear failures, right down to stresses on the fuslage.

repair or replace its what really boils down to is is it worth the risk?
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Old 06-09-2012, 10:02 AM   #8
R1Ryder
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Dude why dont you ask this questin at flyinggiants fourum. Ps nice plane im getting a extra 260 35% from them soon

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