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Newbies: Tips and Information Section of HF, specifically for Passing along info to newcomers to the hobby. Setup, tweaking, orientation practice, etc.


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Old 05-17-2012, 10:09 PM   #21
Marine6680
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Quote:
Originally Posted by togy View Post
Thanks for the answer, you seem to have a lot of knowledge! I discussed this a another thread and made this conclusion, is it correct?;

If the joint looks shiny and good and don't get warm after a run, then it will also admit maximum performance in a 450. And, it's technically possible to measure the quality of a joint, but if the first statement is fulfilled, measuring will not find any resistance that is actually possible to notice when flying a 450.
Yeah, if the joint is shiny, and has good wetting of the parts and the proper amount of solder, then you will be fine.

If the joint feels hotter than the wire, (provided it isn't closer to a source of heat like the ESC) it could be a sign of a bad connection, but you be able to tell a bad connection just from visual inspection 99.9% of the time.
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Old 05-23-2012, 08:04 AM   #22
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One more question. My local hardware store only sell "soldering grease for tinning and soldering". I have electronics lead with flux in. Would I get a good result if I buy the soldering grease to use when I solder xt60 connectors or should I wait and instead order roselin flux from some Internet store?
Thank you in advance!
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Old 05-23-2012, 02:45 PM   #23
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Never used "soldering grease" I would think its just paste flux. Plumbing flux is very strong... it works very well because of its strength, but it can cause issues if you don't clean well.
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Old 05-24-2012, 01:08 PM   #24
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Ok, guess I'll order rosin flux to be on the safe side. Thanks
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Last edited by togy; 05-25-2012 at 01:28 PM..
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Old 05-31-2012, 04:08 PM   #25
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What do you think about the use of solder torches such as the Iroda solder pro 120?
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Old 06-01-2012, 05:07 AM   #26
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What do you think about the use of solder torches such as the Iroda solder pro 120?
I use things like that a lot in my line of work... there is no electricity out on the flight line.

I only use them if I do not have the option to use a normal soldering iron. They work well, but temp control is non-existent. Best for use after you get proficient with a normal iron first. I also would not use them on a circuit board, only for wires/splices, terminals, and switches. Basically no delicate electrics.
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Old 06-01-2012, 05:28 AM   #27
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Thanks for the reply. My main use for this would be to solder EC3 but mainly EC5 bullet connectors. Would you still recommend a station for this? The main hobby ones we have in the UK are approx 48 through to 60 watt, are these suitable? Tell me if you have already covered this but what is the best way to solder these connectors? Thank you.
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Old 06-01-2012, 11:36 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adsmalan View Post
Thanks for the reply. My main use for this would be to solder EC3 but mainly EC5 bullet connectors. Would you still recommend a station for this? The main hobby ones we have in the UK are approx 48 through to 60 watt, are these suitable? Tell me if you have already covered this but what is the best way to solder these connectors? Thank you.
Can you not get Hakko stations there?

I would tin the wire well, put a drop or two of flux in the cup of the connector, slide the wire in the cup and then solder the wire in.
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Old 06-01-2012, 11:47 AM   #29
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Quote:
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Can you not get Hakko stations there?

I would tin the wire well, put a drop or two of flux in the cup of the connector, slide the wire in the cup and then solder the wire in.
I am not sure about the Hakko I will have to do some research. I know Weller are easily obtainable.

The reason I asked about the EC5 bullets is because most people have told me to tin the wire, fill the connector cup with solder to about half to three quarters (depending on wire thickness) and then push the wire into the molten solder.

With your method are you saying fill with solder after the wire is in the cup?
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Old 06-02-2012, 12:25 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adsmalan View Post
I am not sure about the Hakko I will have to do some research. I know Weller are easily obtainable.

The reason I asked about the EC5 bullets is because most people have told me to tin the wire, fill the connector cup with solder to about half to three quarters (depending on wire thickness) and then push the wire into the molten solder.

With your method are you saying fill with solder after the wire is in the cup?
Try to find a Weller WES51 model $125 or a Hakko FX-888 for $80. Also the Trakpower TK950 is good, and its the cheapest at $65, it comes with two tips.

Yes, fill with solder after the wire is in the cup.

The pre-fill method is easier, so that is why people do it, but the method makes a poor joint.
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Old 06-03-2012, 08:55 AM   #31
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Thanks for taking the time to reply to my numerous questions. Weller are horrendously expensive in the UK. I found one place selling the Hakko but I will have to check up on the company. What Hakko iron tip would you recommend for the EC5 5mm bullet connectors? Would it be possible for you to do a short video soldering these bullet connectors to 12 AWG wire?
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Old 06-03-2012, 06:39 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adsmalan View Post
Thanks for taking the time to reply to my numerous questions. Weller are horrendously expensive in the UK. I found one place selling the Hakko but I will have to check up on the company. What Hakko iron tip would you recommend for the EC5 5mm bullet connectors? Would it be possible for you to do a short video soldering these bullet connectors to 12 AWG wire?
Hakko make good irons, so they should serve well.

The largest tip you can get in the iron is best. I think 5mm is the biggest they make.
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Old 06-13-2012, 12:31 PM   #33
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Just got the Hakko FX-888 on Amazon for $80.72 with free 2 day shipping. Looking forward to having a nice indoor soldering station to compliment my portable Weller/Portasol C1C (Which I love BTW)

Also picked up some nice 63/47 solder and a decent Weller solder sucker while was at it. Setting up to start doing a little more side work hopefully.
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Old 06-13-2012, 10:16 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burnoutboy View Post
Just got the Hakko FX-888 on Amazon for $80.72 with free 2 day shipping. Looking forward to having a nice indoor soldering station to compliment my portable Weller/Portasol C1C (Which I love BTW)

Also picked up some nice 63/47 solder and a decent Weller solder sucker while was at it. Setting up to start doing a little more side work hopefully.
Enjoy your new equipment.

And work reasons have prevented me from being able to make any vids soldering large wires.
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Old 06-21-2012, 08:54 AM   #35
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I teach Electronics Technician Maintenance course for the Navy and the first 3 weeks of the course is soldering properly. The biggest thing is cleanliness, and you want to use 63/37 solder because of the Eutectic properties (goes from solid to liquid to solid without a plastic state), as well as R or RMA solder flux. Make sure you have a smooth concave fillet from the wire to the contact surface. Anything more or less won't get you a quality solder connection. If you have questions, please ask. I know quite a bit about this, vice helicopters where I'm just a newbie to the sport.

Paul
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Old 06-21-2012, 08:07 PM   #36
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Good to have another on here that can help/
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Old 06-21-2012, 08:27 PM   #37
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Default heat sink tool

Didn't see mention other than damp paper towel method - but there is a 'heat sink tool' that you can clip onto sensitive electronic components (near where you will be soldering).

The tool will help dissipate the heat that soaks into that delicate component, keeping it a bit cooler while you solder.

You can make your own by using metal tweezers with a rubber band wrapped around tight enough to apply gentle clamping pressure on the component you are protecting.
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Old 06-22-2012, 04:19 PM   #38
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Those heat sinks do help some, but I only ever used them a few times. Last resort kind of thing.

The home made version is a good idea though.
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Old 07-24-2012, 05:40 AM   #39
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Hello again,
I have my station and solder ready to go and I am trying to find a good RMA flux here in the UK. I found this one do you think it will be suitable?

http://www.insatinternational.com/pr...&product_id=84

Thanks.
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Old 07-25-2012, 02:25 AM   #40
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Quote:
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Hello again,
I have my station and solder ready to go and I am trying to find a good RMA flux here in the UK. I found this one do you think it will be suitable?

http://www.insatinternational.com/pr...&product_id=84

Thanks.
That looks like it will work fine.
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