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Old 03-10-2013, 11:15 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Reversed polarity on battery.

Hi guys,

I've signed up on this forum for a specific bit of help, but also because I think I could do with some decent knowledge in this area as well.

I very recently (Friday) bought my son a Blade 450 3D for his Birthday (Satruday). I work most evenings and don't get to see him too often during the day at the moment so I left him with the task of checking the helicopter over and setting up the RC controller telling him we could fly after school tomorrow.

I got home a short while ago to a note saying he had tried to connect the helicopter up to test something and and had ended up connecting the battery the wrong way around (reversed polarity). I'll be honest and say I am not clued in on these things, but my wife advised me there was a puff of smoke from the battery, but that nothing else seems to be damaged. The battery appears to be dead though.

While I know little about these helicopters and their parts, I know enough about LiPo batteries and electronics that reversed polarity usually means something fries.

There isn't a spare battery in the house for me to test with. I have ordered another and will have to wait for it to arrive before I can check anything. However I was wondering if anyone could advise me what potential damage there will be? I've looked it all over but haven't had the time to take anything apart. The plastic coating on the battery around the wires has melted slightly, however on the actual helicopter there is no visible sign of damage, so I'm hoping there is a chance it might be ok?

In any case there is a lesson about patience to be learned here! I guess it might also help if I start learning about the helicopters as well because when it inevitably hits the floor it's going to be dad that has to take it apart and fix it.

Anyway, thanks for your time reading this and for any help you can provide.

Regards
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Old 03-11-2013, 10:40 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Have you tried measuring the resistance across the helicopter ESC terminals? I don't know what the actual value is supposed to be but in most cases an open circuit (infinity) means the ESC is toast.

On the bright side, it is very unlikely that any damage to the upstream electronics would have occurred.

Sorry about your luck. Hope it's just the battery.
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Old 03-11-2013, 12:19 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Just curious. Do you or your son have any previuos expereince on RC helicopters, i.e. coaxial, fixed pitch, or any other micro sized birds. The blade 450 3D is not a beginer level helicopter with out someone on hand who has knowledge and is profecient in flying to help you along.

This helicopter is not a toy and can be extremely dangerous. A new flyer will crash within the first minute of flight without proper training.

Im sorry if Im off base here, but I think that needed to be said. If you are ready for the 450 please forgive my intrusion, only trying to be safe here.

Most of the common connecters cant really be hooked up wrong without some extra force but if that is the case, hopefully the damage will be limited to the lipo. Good luck to you and your son, this is a great hobby that can keep you both very busy.
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Old 03-11-2013, 01:46 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
This helicopter is not a toy and can be extremely dangerous. A new flyer will crash within the first minute of flight without proper training.
More like the first few seconds of attempted flight.

Food for thought. Just a tip over with a blade strike will run $50+ in damages. And accidently bumping the wrong switch on the transmitter can result in an unexpected spool-up with blades whirling @ 2,100 RPM's within a matter of seconds.
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Old 03-11-2013, 03:51 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Default Reversed polarity on battery.

The battery has 3 sections that are joined together with links. On batteries I've seen, one of the links is a section of copper track that's designed to act as a fuse - that's what's probably burned out.

Here's the rub - it is possible to solder something over it (I've done it), but if you do ...

1. If you accidentally momentarily create a short circuit to an adjacent section (which is easy to do with all the solder and small gaps in the area) then the battery will probably instantly explode the moment you do it. You will LITERALLY be working on a live grenade.

2. If you do manage to repair it then you again risk an explosion when you plug it in if the ESC is damaged/shorted because soldering over the link effectively removes the "fuse" and these batteries are capable of delivering phenomenal currents when shorted (over 600 amps), with an instantaneous power discharge that approximates about 3 times what the biggest heater you can plug into a wall socket at home will put out -- and in something that small it doesn't "end well".

My STRONG recommendation is to just dispose of it.

With regards to learning in a 450 class ... I'm a pretty smart guy - I'm a licensed pilot (high performance singles and multi engine) - I've passed all private, commercial, and instrument written exams - I spent 7 years in the Air Force inc maintaining real aircraft - my total time in real planes is in the hundreds of hours - and I spent dozens of hours flying a similar sized (to the 450) coax before stepping up to the 450 ...

... And I damaged the 450 twice before it even got airborne, and several more times within seconds of getting airborne - and quite a few times after that.

No disrespect to you or your son - and the 450 is a great helicopter class - but unless you've already paid your dues on a sim (some do HUNDREDS of hours first), or in smaller collective pitch birds then the chances of the first flight lasting more than a few seconds before crash/damage occurring are ZERO (not even "pretty much zero" I'm afraid).

The thing that I had to learn was the fact that these things aren't toys - they're Radio Controlled aircraft - with many flight performance characteristics that exceed the "real thing" by huge margins. They have ridiculous power to weight ratios. They WILL bite you in the bum in a split second (literally) if you don't know instinctively what to do And I'm serious about the instinctive part -- there is no time to think about what to do. If you need to think then you've already out of control and the bird will be heading to the ground FAST - or worse (eg changing time zones - heading away over houses or towards people, too small to see which way it's pointing), where the flying lawn-mower-without-safety-guards may eventually crash on a road or on people.

Sorry to sound dramatic - but when you eventually get it spun up you'll see what I mean (tips can be close to 400 km/hr at full speed).

Hope this helps.
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Old 03-11-2013, 04:31 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Chaotic tree trimming.

[ame]http://youtu.be/o71LYsDFqjA[/ame]
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Old 03-11-2013, 06:42 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by danfornow1 View Post
Just curious. Do you or your son have any previuos expereince on RC helicopters, i.e. coaxial, fixed pitch, or any other micro sized birds. The blade 450 3D is not a beginer level helicopter with out someone on hand who has knowledge and is profecient in flying to help you along.

This helicopter is not a toy and can be extremely dangerous. A new flyer will crash within the first minute of flight without proper training.

Im sorry if Im off base here, but I think that needed to be said. If you are ready for the 450 please forgive my intrusion, only trying to be safe here.

Most of the common connecters cant really be hooked up wrong without some extra force but if that is the case, hopefully the damage will be limited to the lipo. Good luck to you and your son, this is a great hobby that can keep you both very busy.
Personally I have experience on Micro one's which I believe would be fixed pitch. The biggest I have flown is a Twister 400 sport. My son is the one who is really into the Helicopters and is far far better at flying them than I am.

Just to be clear in this case, my son is 17 years old, just in case people think I am giving something that I would class as a weapon to a young child!

He spent a couple of years flying various micro helicopters, starting with very cheap and poor coaxial one's before moving onto better. He has spent hours outside with a Twister 400 sport, and another one that I am less familiar with.

From what I understand this one is a significant jump over what he has had before. However we have the benefit of several large empty fields on my brothers farmland, so he has a nice vest expanse where he can fly without worrying about people getting hurt (aside from himself).

There are powerlines in the distance, and a small single lane road nearby, but both are protected by trees which would make short work of a helicopter before it became a danger.

While I am not as good as this as he is, I have made sure he is aware that I will be supervising all flights (just in case) and that he is to take things slowly and carefully. His own words to me is that learning this is like starting over again, learning to hover, then slow movements forwards and backwards and so forth.
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Old 03-11-2013, 07:04 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by ColinSouthern View Post
You will LITERALLY be working on a live grenade.

2. If you do manage to repair it then you again risk an explosion when you plug it in if the ESC is damaged/shorted because soldering over the link effectively removes the "fuse" and these batteries are capable of delivering phenomenal currents when shorted (over 600 amps), with an instantaneous power discharge that approximates about 3 times what the biggest heater you can plug into a wall socket at home will put out -- and in something that small it doesn't "end well".

My STRONG recommendation is to just dispose of it.

With regards to learning in a 450 class ... I'm a pretty smart guy - I'm a licensed pilot (high performance singles and multi engine) - I've passed all private, commercial, and instrument written exams - I spent 7 years in the Air Force inc maintaining real aircraft - my total time in real planes is in the hundreds of hours - and I spent dozens of hours flying a similar sized (to the 450) coax before stepping up to the 450 ...

... And I damaged the 450 twice before it even got airborne, and several more times within seconds of getting airborne - and quite a few times after that.

No disrespect to you or your son - and the 450 is a great helicopter class - but unless you've already paid your dues on a sim (some do HUNDREDS of hours first), or in smaller collective pitch birds then the chances of the first flight lasting more than a few seconds before crash/damage occurring are ZERO (not even "pretty much zero" I'm afraid).

The thing that I had to learn was the fact that these things aren't toys - they're Radio Controlled aircraft - with many flight performance characteristics that exceed the "real thing" by huge margins. They have ridiculous power to weight ratios. They WILL bite you in the bum in a split second (literally) if you don't know instinctively what to do And I'm serious about the instinctive part -- there is no time to think about what to do. If you need to think then you've already out of control and the bird will be heading to the ground FAST - or worse (eg changing time zones - heading away over houses or towards people, too small to see which way it's pointing), where the flying lawn-mower-without-safety-guards may eventually crash on a road or on people.

Sorry to sound dramatic - but when you eventually get it spun up you'll see what I mean (tips can be close to 400 km/hr at full speed).

Hope this helps.
The battery itself is what I would classify as "toast." I don't take risks with these things and it is currently waiting to be disposed of at a local recycling centre who said they would take it off my hands. It is currently "contained" in thick plastic bag filled with sand to minimise any fire risk.

My son has put in a lot of hours with micro heli's and a lot of time with a Twister 400 sport. However I don't think he has ever used a simulator for anything. Our local hobby store recommended the machine for him, and the guy in it has always been good to us. It was them who originally suggested that a small 4 channel micro would be more fun, and a better experience than a larger 3 channel my son wanted. He then moved him onto a larger heli (can't remember the name) then the 400 sport. When we advised him my son had become quite proficient with the 400 and wanted a new challenge this was his suggestion.

We are in a fortunate position that my brother has a large amount of empty farmland where the helicopters can be flown win peace and quiet. There are a few other farmhouses nearby, but in most directions he could fly it for a couple of miles and not even get close to someone. The usual place we fly them a field about 200m x 100m. There are hedges lining near the edges of the field and he has been told that if he goes past any of these then the throttle is to be cut, and the helicopter is to come down regardless of the consequences.

My only problem is I don't have a huge interest in this Hobby at all, but if my son enjoys it I want him to have a good time. This means I am not always "clued in" on the specifics of these things, but I get by as best I can by reading forums/sites/etc and taking advice from people like yourself.

I might in this case go and have a chat with my son about the potential speed of the helicopter and reiterate the dangers to him. He is 17 now, and while I know he understands they are not toys, I'm not sure he understands just how much of a jump this might be over the previous one, and just how difficult to handle it might be.
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Old 03-11-2013, 07:18 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Default Reversed polarity on battery.

A battery with the correct connectors would not have plugged in backwards. What kind of battery do you have?
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Old 03-11-2013, 09:20 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by 5307thBP View Post
A battery with the correct connectors would not have plugged in backwards. What kind of battery do you have?
The battery had several "adaptors" to allow it to work in a variety of things. The adaptors, when set up right don't allow you connect it the wrong way. However my son was checking to make sure the adaptor fit onto the helicopter cabling ok, and then in haste connected the adaptor to the battery the wrong way around.

I think the battery was an Overlander one, I honestly cannot check right now as it is inside a bag of sand waiting to be disposed.
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Old 03-12-2013, 12:19 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Default Reversed polarity on battery.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicide View Post
The battery itself is what I would classify as "toast." I don't take risks with these things and it is currently waiting to be disposed of at a local recycling centre who said they would take it off my hands. It is currently "contained" in thick plastic bag filled with sand to minimise any fire risk.

My son has put in a lot of hours with micro heli's and a lot of time with a Twister 400 sport. However I don't think he has ever used a simulator for anything. Our local hobby store recommended the machine for him, and the guy in it has always been good to us. It was them who originally suggested that a small 4 channel micro would be more fun, and a better experience than a larger 3 channel my son wanted. He then moved him onto a larger heli (can't remember the name) then the 400 sport. When we advised him my son had become quite proficient with the 400 and wanted a new challenge this was his suggestion.

We are in a fortunate position that my brother has a large amount of empty farmland where the helicopters can be flown win peace and quiet. There are a few other farmhouses nearby, but in most directions he could fly it for a couple of miles and not even get close to someone. The usual place we fly them a field about 200m x 100m. There are hedges lining near the edges of the field and he has been told that if he goes past any of these then the throttle is to be cut, and the helicopter is to come down regardless of the consequences.

My only problem is I don't have a huge interest in this Hobby at all, but if my son enjoys it I want him to have a good time. This means I am not always "clued in" on the specifics of these things, but I get by as best I can by reading forums/sites/etc and taking advice from people like yourself.

I might in this case go and have a chat with my son about the potential speed of the helicopter and reiterate the dangers to him. He is 17 now, and while I know he understands they are not toys, I'm not sure he understands just how much of a jump this might be over the previous one, and just how difficult to handle it might be.
Sounds like you've got a great responsible attitude - which is the best possible start.

I watched a couple of youtube videos to see what a Twister 400 was - the Trex 450 is definitely up a level. You're going from something that might cut or bruise a finger if it got in the way to something quite capable of cutting it right off. My serious suggestion with 450 class and above is to have a first aid kit handy with some wound pads and bandages.

Some thoughts from my experiences with them ...

- if you install some led lights (can help with specifics if you're interested) it makes it a LOT easier to see which way it's pointing when it gets far away or too high.

- Give some serious though to installing a HeliCommand HC3sX - you can level and climb an out of control bird in less than a heartbeat - they aren't cheap, but will save you a LOT more than they cost you in the long run. It also has self-levelling that let's you determine the degree to which it behaves like a coax -v- a "normal" RC Helicopter.

- watch a few videos of the 450 to get a feel for what you're getting into - they're not in the same "Formula 1" insane power league of the likes of a 700, but still powerful enough to turn on you and bite really hard in the blink of an eye - and when you least expect it.

Hope you'll keep us informed as to how he goes.

- it's good that you've set the trees as a boundary - just keep in mind though that they have to power to climb above the height of most trees in about 1 second - literally. By that stage though, unless he has the benefit of self-levelling from something like a HC3sX it'll most likely quickly end up in an unrecoverable attitude when trying desperately to recover it from up high and far away.

- sounds like your local 100 x 200m park is a good training ground - one of mine is a sports field with several full size rugby fields - and when I've really got my 450 cranked up - most of the time my turns are either over the trees at one end or over the houses at the other. At times I've lost control and had it go higher than aircraft that pass overhead the area on approach to land - so the potential dangers are very very real.
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Old 03-12-2013, 04:35 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Ah I see. I think it might be time to teach your son to solder, since he's keen and all. Watch the leads with lipos when soldering them so you don't short out a new lipo.

Also if your esc is rooted you could still check the rest of the avionics out, throw 5v DC (4xAA NiMH's) onto the AR6115 receiver where the esc connects to it(mind the polarity!) and see if stuff still works.

To add one final thing, if buying a new esc I think the YEP 45A from hobbyking is best bang for buck, but if not adventurous go stock .
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Old 03-12-2013, 09:00 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Default Reversed polarity on battery.

I would recommend batteries with the correct connector on them, like stock or thunder power.

I think if he takes it slow, and careful he should be ok. Keep in mind that the twister looks more like a blade 120sr. So he will have his hands full. This heli will not fly by its self.
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Old 03-12-2013, 09:35 AM   #14 (permalink)
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My only problem is I don't have a huge interest in this Hobby at all, but if my son enjoys it I want him to have a good time. This means I am not always "clued in" on the specifics of these things, but I get by as best I can by reading forums/sites/etc and taking advice from people like yourself.
I would hope he would join with the members here on HF and do some asking, research and sharing his experiences, as well. Just having a middle man, especially one that has little interest in this hobby, do all the footwork seems a little strange.
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Old 03-12-2013, 11:25 PM   #15 (permalink)
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I do agree with your son joining this forum. Besides learning things about his hobby, he can also hone his English skills.

I don't see a problem, learning with a 450 as the entry Heli for collective pitch (CP), on the contrary. Due to modern computerized Radios, you can tame down the Heli as a trainer. Once your skills improve, you can re-program the radio to suit your skills. Even though there are smaller sized CP Helis available, they aren't necessarily the ideal entry level Heli, they can be really twitchy, which makes it hard to learn on.

I've learned a lot about this hobby by studying www.rchelicopterfun.com, I also bought two of his e-books that I recommend. One is about how to setup a Heli and tame it down, the other is about how to level the swash plate.
http://www.rchelicopterfun.com/rc-helicopter-tips.html
http://www.rchelicopterfun.com/swashplate-setup.html

Talking about leveling the swash plate, I had to level mine. On my first attempt to fly the Heli, it was rolling back, right. I tried adjusting the pushrods a bit, but they were too far off.

As you mentioned, your son wanted to start with the basics, like learning to hover this kind of Heli. That alone tells me, your son is mature enough. You can take some advise on the website above. There's a "flying school", containing tips and exercises.

IMO, you should give it a try yourself, 'cause it's so much fun! In addition, it would improve your father/son bond even further.
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Old 03-15-2013, 03:10 PM   #16 (permalink)
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I do agree with your son joining this forum. Besides learning things about his hobby, he can also hone his English skills.
While this would be ideal, the unfortunate truth of the situation is that my son has autism (mild, not too serious) and his English skills are very basic at best. Which is the reason I generally end up as a middleman. We do have some forums in his own language, but they are not very active, and as well as this my son finds it very difficult to interact with people he does not know.

While not exactly related to the original issue, the Helicopter is now repaired and partially working, but we cannot get it to take off. My son has been through everything methodically, but is having no success.

He has double and triple checked all setting in his DX6i and they are exactly as specified in the manual. His swashplate has been levelled and he made a few changes to the gyro, (but insists that the gyro changes are are nothing to do with taking off, and more to do what keeping it straight).

I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions?

The good thing about this is that he seems to have realised it is not going to be anywhere near as easy as the other things he has flown, which should hopefully stop any overconfidence from creeping in!

Thank you all for your help
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Old 03-16-2013, 02:53 AM   #17 (permalink)
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While not exactly related to the original issue, the Helicopter is now repaired and partially working, but we cannot get it to take off. My son has been through everything methodically, but is having no success.
If the blades are turning at what seems like a normal speed - and the left-hand stick is in approximately middle position (in the forward/back direction) then it can only be because the pitch is incorrect, which in turn comes down to 1 of 2 scenarios:

1. It's mechanically misadjusted (even though the swash is level), or

2. It's being told to go to the wrong position.

What I would do is disconnect the motor (usually by separating the 3 bullet connectors) and then power-up the rest of the avionics - then move the throttle / pitch control whilst squatting down to observe the tip of the blade (looking back towards the main shaft) whilst the bird is on a flat surface and the blades are in a 3 o'clock & 9 o'clock position.

You should see a negative angle of attack when the pitch / throttle control is towards you - a relatively neutral / slightly positive angle when it's about 1/2 stick - and about 12 degrees when the stick is furthest away from you.

Also, the swash plate should rise up and down evenly with pitch/throttle control changes.

Perhaps you could look a this first and report back to us?

The transmitter will also have what's called a "pitch curve" programmed into it - usually a number from 0 to 100 assigned to each of 5 pitch / throttle control positions. At this stage you'll want something like about 40 assigned to position 1 (so it's slightly negative blade angle when the stick is all the way back) - 55 at position 2 (slightly positive) - 70 at position 3 (about what's needed for hovering) - 85 at position 4, and 100 at position 5.

Also - if you don't already have a pitch guage then you need one -- just no getting away from it long-term I'm afraid. I use an Align digital one -- they're very accurate - necessary - and easy to use.

http://www.amainhobbies.com/product_...al-Pitch-Gauge

(There are also you tube videos on using them).

Hope this helps.
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Old 03-16-2013, 11:02 AM   #18 (permalink)
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If the blades are turning at what seems like a normal speed - and the left-hand stick is in approximately middle position (in the forward/back direction) then it can only be because the pitch is incorrect, which in turn comes down to 1 of 2 scenarios:

1. It's mechanically misadjusted (even though the swash is level), or

2. It's being told to go to the wrong position.

What I would do is disconnect the motor (usually by separating the 3 bullet connectors) and then power-up the rest of the avionics - then move the throttle / pitch control whilst squatting down to observe the tip of the blade (looking back towards the main shaft) whilst the bird is on a flat surface and the blades are in a 3 o'clock & 9 o'clock position.

You should see a negative angle of attack when the pitch / throttle control is towards you - a relatively neutral / slightly positive angle when it's about 1/2 stick - and about 12 degrees when the stick is furthest away from you.

Also, the swash plate should rise up and down evenly with pitch/throttle control changes.

Perhaps you could look a this first and report back to us?

The transmitter will also have what's called a "pitch curve" programmed into it - usually a number from 0 to 100 assigned to each of 5 pitch / throttle control positions. At this stage you'll want something like about 40 assigned to position 1 (so it's slightly negative blade angle when the stick is all the way back) - 55 at position 2 (slightly positive) - 70 at position 3 (about what's needed for hovering) - 85 at position 4, and 100 at position 5.

Also - if you don't already have a pitch guage then you need one -- just no getting away from it long-term I'm afraid. I use an Align digital one -- they're very accurate - necessary - and easy to use.

http://www.amainhobbies.com/product_...al-Pitch-Gauge

(There are also you tube videos on using them).

Hope this helps.
Checked through all this and it appeared to have come down to the blades being mechanically misadjusted. A few tweaks and check of the swashplate and it took to the air for about 1 minute before it unfortunately hit the floor. Thankfully he had it in a low level hover, and was quick to hit the throttle hold.

The damage sustained was to the blades, the flybar, and some of the linkages. The shaft seems to have come away completely unaffected although a spare has been ordered just in case. A few lessons have been learned and there is some disappointment, but as I pointed out the upside is he knows how to crash "well" and compared to some of the stories I've read and things I've seen the damage is very minimal!

However a much bigger expense may be occured now! Watching this Helicopter being flown really got my adrenaline going, just watching! I've got a serious mind to get myself a small fixed pitch, and something like an mCPX and get into the hobby myself! I have to be honest and say I never really saw much in it before, the micro one my son owned seemed ok and I would fly it occasionally and get some fun out of it, but watching this is like something else altogether. So despite the repairs, I think the biggest cost is going to be me getting into this hobby lol. At least by the time I get to a blade 450 I'll have a son who can likely teach me to fly!

On top of this, I would really like to take the time to thank everyone for their help with this. Despite the crash we have both enjoyed ourselves immensely. I'll definitely be sticking around here, and in a few weeks it will probably be as an enthusiast rather than a middleman!
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Old 03-16-2013, 11:11 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Atomicide View Post
Checked through all this and it appeared to have come down to the blades being mechanically misadjusted. A few tweaks and check of the swashplate and it took to the air for about 1 minute before it unfortunately hit the floor. Thankfully he had it in a low level hover, and was quick to hit the throttle hold.

The damage sustained was to the blades, the flybar, and some of the linkages. The shaft seems to have come away completely unaffected although a spare has been ordered just in case. A few lessons have been learned and there is some disappointment, but as I pointed out the upside is he knows how to crash "well" and compared to some of the stories I've read and things I've seen the damage is very minimal!

However a much bigger expense may be occured now! Watching this Helicopter being flown really got my adrenaline going, just watching! I've got a serious mind to get myself a small fixed pitch, and something like an mCPX and get into the hobby myself! I have to be honest and say I never really saw much in it before, the micro one my son owned seemed ok and I would fly it occasionally and get some fun out of it, but watching this is like something else altogether. So despite the repairs, I think the biggest cost is going to be me getting into this hobby lol. At least by the time I get to a blade 450 I'll have a son who can likely teach me to fly!

On top of this, I would really like to take the time to thank everyone for their help with this. Despite the crash we have both enjoyed ourselves immensely. I'll definitely be sticking around here, and in a few weeks it will probably be as an enthusiast rather than a middleman!
LOL - sorry, but I have to say that what you've described is pretty much "par for the course". With something like a 450 class you'll start off thinking its going to be easy - quickly get to a phase where you'll be thinking "something must be wrong with it -- how the hell could anybody control this thing" - then slowly (and expensively) things will start to fall into place (no pun intended!) and he'll learn to hover tail in - and then move it left/right a bit (still with tail in) - then probably a few pirouettes up higher - followed by a major fight to get it back under control again after a pirouette in the air up high - then nose in hovering (a huge step) and eventually some forward flight with co-ordinated turns.

The only shortcuts are sim practice and a controller with a rescue option (I'm biased, but the HeliCommand HC3sX is generally regarded as having the best rescue system -- and the self-levelling means you don't need it as often either) (I don't want to harp on like a broken record -- all I can say is that it's saved me many more $$$ (both in parts and wasted time) then it's cost me to buy. Wouldn't fly a chopper without one now).

Hope you do get into it too -- I always used to think of electric helicopters as all being like the $79 co-axes you get from your local hardware store -- until I saw what they could do in the hands of experts ... here's an example ...

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Old 03-17-2013, 05:54 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Nice auto there at the end.

Why he kept flirting with that loose piece of carpet flapping in the wash is beyond me.

I just knew it was going to attack at any moment.
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