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130X Blade 130X Helicopters Information and Help


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Old 01-05-2014, 06:34 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default 130x Linear Servos - The Unauthorized Tech Manual

Countless threads in the 130x forum provide snippets of information on the 130x linear servos. This thread attempts to provide a compilation of general information likely of value to most linear servo users. Information has been grouped into separate posts in order to assist future linking to particular information of interest. Most of the information is applicable to both the Spektrum SPMSH2040L cyclic servos and the Spektrum SPMSH2040T tail servo.

The reader is forewarned that some of the posts are lengthy.

PART ONE - Functional Overview, Versions
PART TWO Ė Servo Jitter, Failures and Problems
PART THREE Ė Inspections and Repairs, Cleaning, Lubrication
PART FOUR Ė The Stock Frame and the Elevator Servo
PART FIVE Ė 3-in-1 Servo Connection Mapping
PART SIX - Servo Pushrod Orientations
PART SEVEN - Servo schematic
PART EIGHT - Timing information




130x LINEAR SERVOS - THE UNAUTHORIZED TECH MANUAL
PART ONE
FUNCTIONAL OVERVIEW

Mechanically, the linear servos use a motor and gears to rotate a threaded rod. A threaded plastic actuator bushing on the rod moves linearly as the rod is rotated. Reversing the rotation of the motor and threaded rod reverses the linear movement of the actuator. Installed on the 130x, a servo pushrod loops through a hole in the exposed side of the bushing to extend the linear movement to the swashplate or the tail pitch lever.

A repetitive pulse width signal indicates the servo position desired by the 3-in-1. A microcontroller on the servo interprets these pulses, compares the desired position to the current position, and pulses the motor in the direction required to close the gap. The current servo position is monitored through metal fingers on the bottom of the actuator bushing that wipe along a 10 kOhm resistive strip on the circuit board, forming a potentiometer. The servo applies a locally regulated voltage to the resistive strip, and the contact wipers pick up a voltage correlating to the actuator position on the resistive strip. Additional contact wipers pass the voltage to an adjacent parallel trace so that it can be measured by the microcontroller. In the picture, the long black stripe on the circuit board is the resistive strip.



Major electronic functional blocks on the servos include a 20-pin microcontroller, a 2.7V voltage regulator for the microcontroller, two chips that form an H-bridge drive capable of reversing the servo motor, and two bipolar transistors for interfacing the microcontroller to the H-bridge chips.

VERSIONS

Two versions of the SPMSH204L cyclic servo are known to exist. In late 2012 or early 2013, the circuit board layout was revised to move a few components so that the 130x A-gear would better clear the component side of the servo mounted in the elevator position. Version numbers are silkscreened on the board, under the motor mechanics. Since the version number is hidden, it is easier to look at the location of the components circled in the picture to determine whether a servo is the old or new version. Both versions carry the same SPMSH2040L part number.

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The obvious difference between the cyclic servo and the SPMSH2040T tail servo is that the motor gearing is different. To help ensure the servos are installed in their intended locations, the mounting hole spacing is slightly different for the cyclic and tail servo types.
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Last edited by helibus; 01-11-2014 at 08:27 AM.. Reason: Final edits - added reference to part 8
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Old 01-05-2014, 06:34 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Default Part 2 - Jitter, Failures and Problems

130x LINEAR SERVOS - THE UNAUTHORIZED TECH MANUAL
PART TWO
SERVO JITTER

Jitter observed in the at-rest actuator is typical in a closed-loop mechanical system. Some factors that can lead to the jitter include variances in the pulses coming from the 3-in-1, sampling error in how the servo interprets the pulse width signal, movement of the actuator causing different fingers to contact the trace or conductive strip on the circuit board, dirt or wear in the circuit board strips, noise on the position voltage measurement, and overshoot in the desired motor position.

Some factors lead to the 130x servo jitter being more pronounced than on typical rotary servos. The servo mechanics is exposed, so the 130x servos will be noisier. The 130x servos donít have as much gearing on the motor. Thereís no dampening effect from gear lube. The resistive strip in the position indicator is exposed and can get dirty. Perhaps the 130x servos have little to no deadzone where small errors in the servo position are ignored.

When the 130x servo jitter becomes excessive, cleaning the slider mechanism will usually help.

FAILURES AND PROBLEMS

Any restriction in the servo motorís ability to rotate can cause it to overheat, damaging the motor, the motor mount, or the drive electronics in the process. Causes for this restriction could be grit jamming up the servo gears, damaged bearings in the servo mechanics, or the servo trying to move the actuator when the servo pushrod is up against a mechanical stop. For the cyclic servos, the swashplate should slip freely on the mainshaft, and the swashplate should be approximately centered between the main shaft collar and the main rotor hub when the servos are in their initialized or mid-stick position. Multiple factors can lead to binding on the tail servo. It is important that the pitch lever and pitch slider operate freely, and that the tail servo is positioned properly on the boom in order to provide the necessary range of pitch slider movement on the tail servo. The tail servo is especially troublesome in that crashes or hard hits can cause the servo to slip on the boom or cause the position of the boom in the tail case and/or frame to change, potentially leading to servo binding on subsequent flights.

Especially with the older style cyclic servo, the A-gear can rub against a component on the elevator servo. If this is excessive, it may be possible to wear through the plastic body of the component and damage the internal electronics.

Lubricant, dust and grit can foul up the resistive strip or the adjacent pick-up trace on the servo circuit board. Gear particles and lubrication from the A-gear could also collect on the back of the elevator servo, potentially shorting something out or otherwise affecting servo operation.

In a crash, canopy movement can bend the canopy mounts back and bend or break the top post of the cyclic servo mounted on the left side (when viewed from the front of the 130x).

The servos can develop looseness or slop in how well the actuator holds a fixed position.

Poor factory soldering or excessive vibrations can weaken the points where servo wires or servo motor wires connect to the circuit board.

With time, wear of the conductive fingers on the bottom of the actuator, the resistive strip on the circuit board, or the parallel pick-up trace will inhibit how well the servo can accurately determine the current position.

Brushes in the servo motor may eventually wear out and the motor will no longer work.

Thereís also a common failure where one of the two driver chips in the H-bridge motor circuit burns up on the cyclic servo, most frequently occurring on the elevator servo right after power up. The actuator is typically driven to the full bottom position when this happens. The part that burns up is just to the right of where the A-gear passes on the elevator servo. Possible reasons for the failure have been reviewed, with the most likely reason for the failure discussed in 130x Linear Servos - Demystifying the Smoking Elevator Servo

Some users have reported finding servos with the actuator stuck at the top of the servo, at the end away from the gears. In experimenting with just the servo mechanics I noticed the actuator bushing would stick almost every time I used the motor to drive the actuator to that end. What I think happens is that ramming the actuator bushing into the end of the black housing causes it to bind up and act as a jam nut on the threaded rod. The motor doesn't appear to have enough torque to break it free, so it remains stuck there until manually rotating the gears to back the actuator off a bit. I would occasionally see the actuator get stuck at the gear end as well, but not as regularly as at the other end. If you find the actuator frozen at one end or the other after a flight, it could be it got stuck there during full-stick movements in an extreme maneuver. Manually rotate the gears as required to back off the actuator, and observe what happens to the actuator when you initialize the 130x. If the actuator moves back to the extreme position, the servo drive electronics has probably failed. If the actuator doesn't move to the extreme, you're likely OK to fly again.
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Last edited by helibus; 01-11-2014 at 08:26 AM.. Reason: Final edits of initial posting
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Old 01-05-2014, 06:35 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Default Part 3 - Inspections and repairs, cleaning, lubrication

130x LINEAR SERVOS - THE UNAUTHORIZED TECH MANUAL
PART THREE
INSPECTIONS AND REPAIRS

Check for poorly soldered connections for either the motor or servo cable; resolder as necessary. Tuck the motor wires down so they will be less likely to catch on things.

Verify the wires all appear to be intact; wires that easily make sharp bends may be broken inside the insulation. Consider applying a small dab of silicone or other adhesive to minimize wire movement at the solder connection.

Make sure the black frame for the servo mechanics is secured to the circuit board. Replace any missing screws and carefully tighten if necessary; consider adding dab of Zap Goo or similar glue on the screw heads. Consider adding small dabs or a thin bead of glue along edges of the frame to further help hold it to the circuit board.

Verify the straps passing over the motor arenít cracked, broken or melted apart. Verify the motor isnít loose in the frame - add a dab of silicone or other adhesive to the motor and frame if necessary.

Verify the two plastic gears are clean and properly mesh. With power off, manually rotate the gears and verify smooth rotation through the entire range of actuator movement.

Verify the brass nuts are intact on the end of the threaded rod away from the gears, and that there is a dab of glue on the outer one to lock it in place.

Verify the tab on the actuator isnít broken or cracked and that the hole doesnít appear excessively worn.

Some of the linear slop in the actuator may be able to be removed by tightening the location of the locknuts on the threaded rod. If not done properly, however, all this might do is cause the large white gear on the other end of the threaded rod to move on the shaft and the slop will return. Hold the large white gear still while removing the outer locknut with needlenose pliers or other suitable tool. Back the large white gear away from the servo frame a bit. Holding the large white gear still again, now tighten the inner locknut. My experience on a small sample of servos indicates you can tighten the inner nut as far is it will go, but check to make sure the actuator rod spins freely and loosen the inner locknut slightly if necessary. Reinstall the second locknut, tightening it up against the first nut and adding a dab of glue or threadlocker to lock the nut in place.

Slop in how the actuator rides on the threaded rod is tougher to deal with. Threads have discussed adding a thin coat of CA to the threaded rod and modifying the actuator to improve the mechanical fit, but those mods are considered beyond what most users would be willing to tackle.

The large white gear shouldnít be pushed onto the actuator rod too hard. Doing so may cause binding between the large white gear and the brass bushing behind it.

Proper servo "centering" can be verified. The servo design includes a fixed tap near the center of the position indicator resistive strip that can be read by the servo microcontroller. The servo microcontroller appears to locate the servo actuator at this tap location when the servo is being commanded to the center position. The servo board includes a round test point circuit pad at the tap - this pad can be observed in the servo picture included in the Functional Overview portion of Part 1 of this manual. Maybe by chance, the round pad sticks out from the black motor mount when the servo mechanics is installed and can be used as a visual indicator of where the servo feels the center point is. Proper centering can be inspected by verifying the actuator sits directly above the round pad with the 130x initialized and throttle hold on. Note that the actuator is NOT in the center of the mechanics when the servo is at the commanded center.




The servo mechanics portion of the servos is replaceable. Spektrum part number SPM6837 is the servo mechanics for the SMSH2040L cyclic servos, and part number SP6838 is the servo mechanics for the SMSH2040T tail servo. The servo mechanics consists of the black plastic frame with mounting screws, the motor, gears appropriate for that servo type, and the threaded rod assembly with bearings, locknuts and the actuator bushing with contact wipers. Installation requires desoldering the wires from the old motor and soldering the wires from the new motor to the servo board. Note the motor wire colors before removing the old motor so the new motor can be connected the same way.

CLEANING

Dirt can be removed from the white gears with a clean toothbrush or something similar. Grit stuck in the gear teeth can be removed using a pin, sharp-pointed hobby knife, or the edge of a piece of paper.

The generally preferred material for cleaning the resistive strip in the servos is DeoxIT D5 spray from CAIG. A basic contact cleaner or electronics cleaner spray may flush away dirt or other foreign matter, but the DeoxIT D5 spray includes a deoxidizer that seems to provide longer term results. In the USA, Deoxit D5 is available from several online retailers. Some of the more common brick-and-mortar stores that carry it include Frys, MicroCenter, and Guitar Center. Other electronic component and sound equipment stores may also have it.



In summary, a small amount of the cleaner is sprayed into the open threaded rod channel of the servo, and the servo is quickly operated through its range of movement while the spray is wet. Adjust the D5 nozzle to the "L" setting, and only a partial press of the spray nozzle is necessary. To ensure maximum effect, operate the servos with the motor disconnected and run them through worst case combinations of pitch and cyclic extremes. Some perform this cleaning every few flights; others wait until they have a servo with excessive jitter , 130x shudder, or other problem.

More information and suggestions for improved spray tips is available in the Questions on using D5 thread.

With a servo removed from the 130x and the servo mechanics unbolted from the circuit board, the strips on the circuit board and the contact fingers on the actuator can be cleaned with 91% Isopropyl Alcohol and a cotton swab. The tightly-woven craft cotton swabs are best for this. Be careful with the delicate contact fingers Ė donít bend them during the cleaning process. When the servo is disassembled, the resistive strip and contact fingers should be inspected for damage or unusual wear. Cleaning with alcohol and a cotton swab may be the best way to remove foreign material, but DeoxIT still may be the preferred approach for removing any oxidation related problems.

Gear lube and other junk collecting on the component side of the circuit boards should be able to be flushed with the same spray used to clean the resistive strip.

LUBRICATION

A thorough cleaning of the servo could remove lubrication from the bushing and bearing on the actuator threaded rod. Purists may want to relubricate these with TriFlow or other light lubrication. Use a pin or CA applicator tip to apply only a very slight amount of oil. Donít apply enough that it flows onto the threaded rod or the resistive strip where it will collect dust and create new problems.
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Last edited by helibus; 01-13-2014 at 09:52 AM.. Reason: Added inspection for servo centering
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Old 01-05-2014, 06:36 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Default Part 4 - The Stock Frame and the Elevator Servo

130 LINEAR SERVOS - THE UNAUTHORIZED TECH MANUAL
PART FOUR

The stock frame for the 130x presents multiple concerns for the elevator servo mounted right behind the motor. Readers with aftermarket 130x frames need to determine on their own whether any of these considerations apply to their frame.

ELEVATOR SERVO MOUNTING

The elevator servo is not screwed onto the 130x frame like the other servos. Rather, the elevator servo is held by grooves in the frame for three corners of the servo circuit board.

ELEVATOR SERVO A-GEAR CLEARANCE

The design of the stock 130x frame provides minimal clearance between the A-gear and the circuit component side of the elevator servo, although the concern has been reduced on the newer version servos through a different component layout.

For the original servo boards, older threads discuss checking to be sure there is clearance of at least the thickness of a strip of paper for the entire rotation of the A-gear. One method of increasing the clearance is to file or mill the A-gear to a slightly smaller diameter. Aftermarket A-gears may be found to be a smaller diameter. It may also be possible to shim the servo board forward with small bits of tape on the circuit board corners.



Another method of shimming the board forward is to jam layers of tape or something similar between the top edge of the servo board and the frame after the servo is installed. Some threads have also mentioned intentionally leaving one of the servo corners outside of the frame channel, thereby pushing that corner forward.

An advantage of any method of shimming the board forward is that the servo board will likely be held tighter in the frame than in the OEM design. Shimming the servo forward will, however, reduce the clearance between the servo mechanics and the motor. This may be a concern for those who have installed an aftermarket outrunner motor.

ELEVATOR SERVO PROTECTION

Consideration should be given to covering the circuit component side of the elevator servo to protect it from collecting lubrication and wear material from the A-gear, and from dust or dirt being attracted to the lubricant. A few threads have suggested using something like nail polish as a conformal coating on the board.

If there is A-gear clearance for it, another approach is covering the circuit board with clear packaging tape or thin plastic. Clear is suggested so that components under the tape can be inspected. To ease servo installation in the frame, tape used as corner shims should be flat to the circuit board. With thinner tape that is sticky enough, it may be possible to extend the cover so it also serves as the corner shims or to wrap the tape a bit up to the servo mechanic side of the board. Thicker tape or sheet plastic may require a cutout for the yellowish block capacitor mounted just above where the A-gear passes the board. It is important that the cover is flush to the lower circuit components near where the A-gear sits. Check for clearance between the A-gear and the covering after final assembly; try tucking the covering down with a hobby knife blade if necessary. When lube and dirt collects on the cover, it can be removed with a fine pointed hobby cotton swab. No problem has been noted with the tape covering causing any component overheating. Colored tape has been used in the picture for clarity.



ELEVATOR SERVO REPLACEMENT ACCESS

The design of the stock frame complicates the process of replacing the elevator servo mounted behind the motor. Due to these complications, a new servo should always be exercised and tested for proper operation before it is installed.

Especially on a first-time replacement, it is arguably best to replace the elevator servo with the 130x frame completely split apart. If nothing else, this assists observing how the servo board is held in the frame. When elevator servo replacement is deemed necessary, it may be prudent to do it as part of a complete tear down so other components such as gears and bearings can be inspected, cleaned, or replaced. On reassembly, start with the front servo board placed in the longer channels of the left frame side. Install the elevator servo pushrod before joining the frame halves.



It is possible to replace the elevator servo without fully splitting the frame. This can be done by removing the landing gear, the canopy mount, the seven frame screws forward of the boom mount, and then carefully prying open the front of the frame just enough to allow the servo to be manipulated out of the frame. With an outrunner motor, the motor may have to be removed or loosened as well. While still an extensive effort, it does assist leaving the torque tube and tail boom in place so that the tail assembly isn’t affected. Keep an eye on the B-gear to make sure it doesn’t fall out during this process.

In My short cut to replace elevator servo, guru doubleCH describes cutting away portions of the upper frame channels that hold the elevator servo. This makes it easier to replace the servo without frame disassembly. The mod can also shim the servo forward a bit for elevator servo clearance.

ELEVATOR SERVO PUSHROD INSTALLATION

The elevator servo pushrod should be installed onto the servo before the servo is installed in the frame. Attempting to install it later requires some force that can stress the servo mechanics or the servo circuit board. To minimize this if the pushrod must be installed later because it was forgotten, disconnect the motor, initialize the 130x, provide some throttle, and command full pitch and up elevator from the TX. This will move the servo actuator up as far as it will go, improving access to the pushrod hole in the actuator.
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Last edited by helibus; 01-13-2014 at 09:45 AM.. Reason: Final edits to initial post for clarity
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Old 01-05-2014, 06:36 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Default Part 5 - 3-in-1 Servo Connection Mapping

130x LINEAR SERVOS - THE UNAUTHORIZED TECH MANUAL
PART FIVE
3-in-1 SERVO CONNECTION MAPPING

Horizon Hobby provides the following information in the 130x Q&A pages for the 130x:
When viewing from the front and looking from left to right the order is as listed below:
  • The far left port is the servo which is located (when view from the front) on the right rear side. (Green)
  • The second port in is the servo located right behind the motor (Black)
  • The third port in is the servo located on the left rear (when viewing from the front)(Pink)
  • The forth port in is the Tail servo located on the tail boom of the helicopter (Unmarked)
Note that the cables for the two side servos (described by HH as right rear and left rear) will cross in their connections to the 3-in-1.


Last edited by helibus; 01-05-2014 at 07:27 PM.. Reason: Initial population of reserved post
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Old 01-05-2014, 07:11 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Very well written!.......Mods, please sticky.
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Old 01-05-2014, 07:38 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Yep, well written.. Deserves a sticky.

I wish the mods would take all those stickies and put them under one sticky that says stickies.

Too many freaking stickies stuck, IMO. Sorta speaks volumes about the 130.
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Old 01-05-2014, 07:39 PM   #8 (permalink)
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How about a forum for just the 130x stickies....

BTW - I'm wrapping up my analysis of the "smoking elevator servo" failure. That'll be documented in a separate thread within the next couple of days. It will be in a separate thread since my conclusion is likely to be somewhat controversial and I don't want to muck up this thread with discussion over that.

EDIT: The failure analysis is now available at 130x Linear Servos - Demystifying the Smoking Elevator Servo Failure
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Last edited by helibus; 01-07-2014 at 02:23 AM.. Reason: Added link to the failure analysis
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Old 01-05-2014, 07:54 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by koi-fish View Post
Very well written!.......Mods, please sticky.
+++110% on the sticky!!

There's already a lot I know, but this is EXACTLY the type of info that should be stuck!!!

WOW heilbus! You have done a phenomenal job with this write up man!!!!!!! Thanks for the info and write up. Well done.

Seth
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Old 01-05-2014, 08:41 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Wow... an amazing amount of work. Sticky post for sure!
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Old 01-05-2014, 08:52 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Nice job Helibus. Thanks for putting in all that effort.
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Old 01-05-2014, 10:28 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Great sticky info!
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Old 01-05-2014, 11:23 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Default Excellent work

This must have taken up a good couple of hours. Thanks for taking the time to do this excellent write up.
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Old 01-06-2014, 08:55 AM   #14 (permalink)
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very helpful. Great!
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Old 01-09-2014, 12:28 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Default Part 6 - Servo Pushrod Orientations

130x LINEAR SERVOS - THE UNAUTHORIZED TECH MANUAL
PART SIX
SERVO PUSHROD ORIENTATIONS

The servo pushrods should be installed so that they are vertical between the servo actuator and the swashplate. This requires the hook on the pushrods to be installed from a particular side of the actuator. The spring-action loops in the pushrods should be oriented as shown in the picture. Note that in the BLH3708 pushrod set, one of the pushrods is formed different from the other two. In differs in the direction of the hook with respect to the spring loop. The different one goes on the left side servo, viewed from the front. In the picture, this is the servo in the back.

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Last edited by helibus; 01-10-2014 at 11:29 PM.. Reason: clarifications
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Old 01-09-2014, 12:47 PM   #16 (permalink)
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What a fantastic post. thank you helibus
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Old 01-09-2014, 12:49 PM   #17 (permalink)
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Default Part 7 - The Servo Schematic

130x LINEAR SERVOS - THE UNAUTHORIZED TECH MANUAL
PART SEVEN
SERVO SCHEMATIC
For the techies that feel a tech manual should include a schematic, here's one for the linear servos deduced by visual inspection and an ohmmeter.
The reference designators are arbitrary. Here's a photo of the servo mapping to the reference designators used in the schematic.
Motor control is accomplished through an H-bridge motor circuit. Voltage to the motor is reversed by switching on diagonal pairs of drivers in the H-bridge. A fixed voltage regulator provides 2.7V nominal for the microcontroller. Signals connected to the microcontroller include the PWM servo signal from the 3-in-1, voltage from the current position of the actuator on the servo resistive strip, voltage from a tap on the resistive strip at about the half-way point, and two outputs for driving the H-bridge. Note that the part number of the microcontroller has been removed during manufacture; the numbers shown on the part in the picture might be a date code or other ancillary info. Part numbers on the voltage regulator and transistors appear to be either proprietary or from an obscure manufacturer. At a glance, the electronic design of the two versions of the 130x linear cyclic servo and the linear tail servo appear to be identical.
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Old 01-10-2014, 09:37 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Old 01-10-2014, 09:57 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Old 01-10-2014, 09:58 AM   #20 (permalink)
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As described in the below post from RCG, I think the 5% Deoxit F5 product may be more appropriate than the D5 product for cleaning dirty Blade Linear Servos:

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Originally Posted by i812 View Post
I did a little research on the Deoxit products.

From what I'm able to ascertain, the Deoxit product Prefix signifies what type of electrical conducting material the product is designed/formulated to clean:

D Series is for cleaning Metal Electrical Contacts (example: metallic electrical Connector contacts)

G Series is for cleaning Gold Electrical Contacts (example: gold plated electrical Connector contacts)

F Series is for cleaning Conductive Carbon or Plastic Electrical Contacts (example: Variable Resistors made from conductive Carbon or Plastic)

S Series is for Metal Electrical Contacts exposed to outdoor environment

The product Suffix signifies the % concentration of the electrical Contact Cleaner in the container:

5 = 5%

100 = 100%

The 100% product is intended to be used on clean new build Potentiometers/Faders, and the 5% product contains 95% solvent/propellent solution intended to be used to clean dirty Potentiometers/Faders.


Here is a link to the Deoxit product application manual that I compiled the above info from: https://system.netsuite.com/core/med...addrcountry=US

I believe to fully understand which Deoxit product to use, a person needs to know how the electrical device they are trying to clean and/or protect is fabricated.

AFAIK the Servos used in Blade products use Carbon or Plastic resistive pads, AND a sliding Metal wiper. This is standard technology used for fabricating inexpensive Variable Resistors. From reading the above referenced Deoxit Application Manual, I have the impression they qualify the Variable Resistor used in the Blade Servos as a "Fader", and therefore we should be using their F Series Deoxit cleaner/lubricator.

Variable Resistors can also be fabricated from metal Wire (instead of conductive Carbon or Plastic), and apparently the Deoxit Application Manual refers to "wire" wound Variable Resistors as Potentiometers, and recommends the D Series cleaner to clean the "metal". I believe wire wound Variable Resistors are more expensive, more reliable, and heavier than otherwise equivalent conductive Carbon or Plastic fabricated Variable Resistors.

I'm not a chemist, but do know that generally: different chemicals dissolve different types of materials.

For instance, generally: acids dissolve metal, but do not dissolve Carbon or Plastic.

I can't think of anything that dissolves Carbon, but probably many of us (not me at the moment) can think of something that dissolves plastic but not metal.

For the most part, all the Deoxit products claim to be Plastic safe, and all the Amazon product reviewers seem to confirm no problems spraying or wiping any of the Dexoit products on plastic.

I can't say, I'm an expert and know all the intricate detail about the various Deoxit products, but from the little that I think I may have learned, I'm inclined to think we should be using the F series to clean the Carbon or Plastic conducting resistive pads inside our Servos.

I can positively confirm, that a few years ago I took apart erratic mSR Servos and successfully cleaned their conductive resistive Pad and Wiper with Isopropyl Alcohol and Q-Tip. AFAIK all that did was clean the loose debris off from the Resistive Pad and Wiper, so that the Wiper made better electrical contact to the Resistive Pad. I don't believe the Alcohol did anything chemically except maybe help loosen (with the help of slight Q-Tip pressure) some grime that may have accumulated on the contact surface areas.

The Deoxit Application Manual indicates that new (un-oxidized) or freshly cleaned used contacts will remain un-oxidized (good electrical conducting) if their "Lube" is applied. I imagine that would be the main "chemical" difference between using the Deoxit product and Alcohol; however, after cleaning with Alcohol, my Servo seemed to last just as long as when it was new, before it became erratic and needed cleaning again.
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