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Old 08-03-2017, 05:29 PM   #61 (permalink)
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Hakko has an RF soldering system now:

https://www.hakko.com/english/products/hakko_fx100.html

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Old 08-03-2017, 07:09 PM   #62 (permalink)
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Experimented a bit with the Xytronic LF-3200, it's a night and day difference compared to the FX888D. I can set it to 700 degrees touch the tip (3.5mm) to the edge of the solder cup on a 6mm bullet without touching the wire and 2-3 seconds later the solder melts and the wire comes off without wicking the wire. The temp display on the base station shows only a 1-2 degree drop in temperature while doing this. With the FX888D I had to set it to 800 degrees to solder large connectors like that. Later tonight I will experiment with lowering the temp even further.

Last edited by Atomic Skull; 08-03-2017 at 07:57 PM..
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Old 08-03-2017, 07:38 PM   #63 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomic Skull View Post
Experimented a bit with the Xytronic LF-3200, it's a night and day difference compared to the FX888D. I can set it to 700 degrees touch the tip (3.5mm) to the edge of the solder cup on a 6mm bullet without touching the wire and 2-3 seconds later the solder melts and the wire comes off without wicking the wire. The temp display on the base station shows only a 1-2 degree drop in temperature while doing this. With the FX888D I had to set it to 800 degrees to solder large connectors like that. Later tonight I will experiment with lowering the temp even further.
So in other words, you are happy with the Xytronic LF-3200?

(I see that its only about $130 - very tempting!)
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Old 08-03-2017, 08:07 PM   #64 (permalink)
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So in other words, you are happy with the Xytronic LF-3200?

(I see that its only about $130 - very tempting!)
Yup so far it seems like one of my best purchases. I recommend getting a 2.4 and 3.2mm screwdriver tips for it though if you are going to solder larger connectors. Howard Electronics and MCM Electronics have larger selections of tips than Jameco does (they only had 4 tips and I had to get the bigger ones elsewhere) Also keep in mind that some places have the LF3500 and LF3000 tips mixed up. Look on page 24 of their catalog for a correct listing. I wish they had a 5mm screwdriver tip as that would be useful for tinning wires but the 3.2mm works fine for that.

After some more experimenting 700F seems just about right.

EDIT: After some more experimenting and adjusting my technique (preheat the connector first) I've settled on 550F.





Figured I should practice a bit before I used it on anything serious. Preheating the connector before inserting the wire is no longer necessary instead I can heat it by the edge with the wire in place until it comes up to temp (takes about 2-3 seconds) then feed the solder into the cup and move the iron over to the wire for about half a second to make sure everything is completely molten before removing. From start to finish took about 5 seconds.

EDIT: I have since lowered the temp to 550F and went back to my old method of preheating the connector first before inserting the wire and then flowing the solder. This way the solder sets within 2-3 seconds of so of removing the iron and there is much less chance of excessive wicking.
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Last edited by Atomic Skull; 08-04-2017 at 12:24 AM..
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Old 08-04-2017, 12:16 PM   #65 (permalink)
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^^^ looks good
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Old 08-05-2017, 04:52 AM   #66 (permalink)
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I found some teardowns of Xytronic equipment if anyone is interested in what the quality of the internals is like.

Teardown of a Xytronic LF-389D soldering station. Though after using an inductive iron I would never even consider using a thermally heated one ever again.

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/review...ering-station/

Teardown of the LF-3000, this is the predecessor of the LF-3200, it uses the same tips and iron but wattage is lower (90w vs 120w for the LF-3200)

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testge...ering-station/

Last edited by Atomic Skull; 08-05-2017 at 05:22 AM..
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Old 08-07-2017, 06:51 AM   #67 (permalink)
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Nice work there, Mr Skull

I have used induction heated irons at work, among other things. Tried quite a few different makes along the years. My experience is that it does not really matter how the iron works, as long as it is quality piece of equipment. In the end, it is more up to your skills and other factors.

Generally speaking 80W is enough for soldering these hobby size connectors, as long as it is temperature controlled. Whether 550F or 600F or 700F is best, really depends on the technique, and chems, and solder, and the phase of the moon...

For hobby projects, I settled down with a iron with a heating element and cheap tips. I use for it heating up other things, like bearings and screws, so sometimes the tips get damaged. If it was only for soldering, I would think about getting one of these fancier induction things.
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Old 08-07-2017, 11:05 PM   #68 (permalink)
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Inductively heated irons are less affected by thermal mass and not affected at all by conductivity between the heating element and the tip because they heat the tip directly.

Anyway, I ended up bumping the temp up slightly to 600F and switching from a chisel tip to a 3mm hoof tip. Especially with the 6mm RC Proplus connectors I find the hoof tip less likely to wick solder up out of the solder cup and onto the side of the connector (the sides don't hold solder only the beveled tip) 550F worked but the solder was reluctant to form a proper fillet onto the wire with the 6mm cut away type bullets.
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